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Common or Virginian Deer

On view

Common or Virginian Deer

Artist: John Woodhouse Audubon (American, 1812 - 1862)

Date: c.1845-1847
Medium: oil on canvas
Dimensions:
22 1/8 x 28 1/8 inches (56.2 x 71.4 cm)
Classification: Paintings
Credit Line: Purchase of the Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher Stark Foundation, 1982
Object number: 31.210.1
Accession Number: 1982.107.0
Label Text:John Woodhouse Audubon painted this representation of a male and female deer for The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. The Quadrupeds, like The Birds of America, showed the subjects in natural habitats. John Woodhouse portrayed the deer in a lush wooded setting. The female drinks from a stream as the male stands alert. The scene relates to elements of the text by John James Audubon and John Bachman. “This animal cannot exist without water, being obliged nightly to visit some stream or spring for the purpose of drinking.” Today this deer is commonly called the white-tailed deer.
Provenance: Artist; by inheritance to his second wife Carolina Audubon [Caroline Hall, 1811-1899]; by inheritance to her daughters Maria Rebecca Audubon [1843-1925] and Florence [1853-1949][1]; E. Mable Kavanagh; Mr. Keven Anreae and Mrs. Claire Fisher; (Webster Inc.); (Hirschl & Adler, New York); Michael Zinman, New York, New York; purchased September 27, 1982 through (W. Graham Arader, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania) by the Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher Stark Foundation; accessioned to the Stark Museum of Art | 1. According to a letter dated September 24, 1982 the inscription on the frame read "Maria and Florence Aud[ubon] from Carolina Audubon" when it came into the possesion in Mr. Zinman.
Exhibitions:
  • Western Classics: Highlights from the Collection
  • Drawn to Life: Audubon's Legacy